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Explore the arts, culture, history, and heritage on the New South Wales side of the Murray River

Federation Museum, Corowa. Image credit: Murray Regional Tourism

3 Aug. 2021 by Mel Townsend

Explore the Arts, Culture, History, and Heritage on the New South Wales side of the Murray River

Calling all history buffs and cultural appreciating New South Wales residents.

While travel restrictions are in place along the New South Wales and Victorian border, we know just the place you can explore, and it’s right in your backyard.

Whether you’re a ute enthusiast, wanting to better acquaint yourself with the birthplace of Australian federation, or looking to expand your knowledge on the world history of transportation and the revolution of the grain harvesting industry, there’s plenty of heritage to lap up along New South Wales side of the Murray River.

We’ve pulled together a list of the best places to tick off your list on a cultural escape along the New South Wales side of The Murray.

1. Deni Ute Muster Museum

While some practice culture through fine dining and arts, Deniliquin embraces theirs with a Guinness World Record breaking ute muster and blue singlet count.

The annual Deni Ute Muster festival first began in 1999 and has been a tradition every year since. The two-day event is celebrated with 24 hours of live music, bull riders, whip cracking, and of course, the iconic ute muster.

If you can’t make it to the October Festival, not to worry, the tradition has now been memorialised at the Deni Ute Muster Museum. Having opened in early 2021, the museum will take you along the 22-year journey of the Deni Ute Muster, catching you up to speed with the rural event all year round.

You’ll find the museum on the Deni Ute Muster Site in Deniliquin, meaning you’ll even have the opportunity to snap a photo in front of the famous Deni Ute Muster gates or the 30ft Comet windmill.

2. The Depot Historic Vehicle and Memorabilia Collection

Take a deep dive into the history of trucking, transport, and cars from all around the world at the Depot Historic Vehicle and Memorabilia Collection.

The Depot brings history to life as you take a nostalgic trip down memory lane making your way past interactive displays, activities, and memorabilia telling the stories of life on the road throughout the decades.

You’ll find The Depot in Deniliquin, pieced together by locals and private collectors, with each vehicle telling a tale of its own, from Hollywood movie sets to local history.

3. Corowa Federation Museum

Immerse yourself in the rich history of Corowa, (also known as, the birthplace of federation) at the Corowa Federation Museum.

The museum's exhibitions walk you through Corowa's involvement in Australia becoming a federation alongside the crucial role that Dr. John Quick played in this.

Navigate your way through the museum’s displays packed full of history, stepping you back in time through the blacksmith shop and agricultural equipment displays.

Discover Aboriginal artefacts including sketches by Tommy McRae, a local and now nationally recognised 19th-century aboriginal artist.

4. Jindera Pioneer Museum

The Jindera Pioneer Museum will whisk you back over 100 years to 19th century living within their seven heritage precincts, housing 25 original and replicated rooms and galleries.

Recreating the material culture of German settlers that arrived in the Jindera area in 1867, the Jindera Pioneer Museum gifts a captivating insight into their day-to-day lifestyle.

The museum complex consists of an extensive collection including farming implements and equipment and a historic post office, all set on the original Wagner’s Store, residence, and grounds restored to their original condition.

5. Headlie Taylor Header Museum

Ingrain yourself in Australia’s grain harvesting history at the Headlie Taylor Header Museum.

Headlie Taylor revolutionised the grain industry in 1914 with his invention of the header harvester, the first auto header to be produced commercially.

Headlie’s inventions advanced the grain harvesting technology of the time so significantly that it put Australia on the map as a successful grain-producing country.

The relocation of an authentic header harvester and blacksmith shop to Bicentennial Park in Henty sparked the opening of the Headlie Taylor Header and Blacksmith Shop Museum in 2010.

On a tour of the blacksmith shop, you’ll gain insight into this pivotal era of the grain industry, viewing harvesting tools, and some of Headlie’s original prototypes.